Mental Strength and Deescalation

Avoiding conflict is human nature, most of us would say we’d rather live a happy life than sit in a dull anger filled world. When most people are asked how they deal with conflict, most say they avoid it because it’s human nature to avoid things we don’t like (Runde, 2012). But in reality there may be times where we are faced with the challenge of having to face confrontation whether we want to or not. Some of those instances would (and could) include living in a high crime-rate neighborhood, having bad blood with former spouses whom you share parenting time, deranged ex-lovers and the list could go on. Granted we would like to change our living arrangements, but it’s not that easy for some of us. Because we are pro-firearm and pro-safety, it’s our duty to explore the possibility that we may encounter a situation that we are carrying a firearm and face a verbal or physical altercation at any time. That being said, we also have a duty of being responsible, and that means making attempts at deescalating situations before they arise. In every life or death situation where a gun shot is required there is the right time to pull the trigger. If you shoot too early you face the possibility that violence could be avoided, and if you shoot too late you might not have to opportunity to pull the trigger at all. According to the National Association of Social Workers there are two critical elements that are involved in deescalation: Reasoning with an enraged person is not possible. The first and only objective in deescalation is to reduce the...